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Surreal Tilt-Shift Versions of Vincent Van Gogh Paintings

Tilt Shift Van Gogh Painting

Reddit user Melonshade, created and posted a series of surreal images of Surreal Tilt-Shift Versions of Vincent Van Gogh Paintings, as though being viewed through a tilt-shift lens.

Reddit can indeed be an exciting place to find new forms of graphic and visual inspiration. 

Melonshade explains, having been inspired by image manipulations previously created by Serena Maylon, on Artcyclopedia.:

I saw this a while back and it inspired me to try it myself, this is the outcome!… I haven’t edited anything besides the blur.

Many of his later paintings are much brighter and more colorful than the rest.

I read that he started to use more colours because he wanted to paint things the way he saw them, not the way they were.

When I first saw the title of this post on Laughing Squid, without having first seen the images, I wasn't expecting an awful lot.

However, the tilt-shift effect on these masterpieces really does add a whole new level of beauty to Van Gough's paintings.

Found on Laughing Squid.

 

Tilt Shift Vincent Van Gogh Painting

Tilt Shift Vincent Van Gogh Painting

Tilt Shift Vincent Van Gogh Painting

TiltShiftVan Gogh 01

Tilt Shift Vincent Van Gogh Painting

Tilt Shift Van Gogh Painting

Tilt Shift Van Gogh Painting

Tilt Shift Vincent Van Gogh Painting



Vintage Colour Wheels, Charts and Tables Throughout History

As a graphic designer, where colour is pretty darn important, This selection of Vintage Colour Wheels, Charts and Tables Throughout History has made me far too excitable!

The moment I found the post, and saw the featured image and post title, I clicked it straight away, and onto the website of Public Domain Review: A Project of the Open Knowledge Foundation, which is a website I'd highly recommend poking around.

You know sometimes you can visit a post and ultimately end up somewhat, or very, disappointed with the content, like the featured image and fancy headline is literally the best bit, but not so in this case.

So here's the thing for any of your commercial printing nerds (me included): many of the images featured have been sourced from Sarah Lowengard’s book: The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe – published electronically on Gutenberg-e in 2006.

Also, according to PDR, another must-have book on colour, is: Philip Ball’s Bright Earth: Art and the Invention of Color (2003) for a great look at how art, chemistry, and technology have interacted through the ages.

Anywho, enjoy some of the featured images below, and remember to visit: http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/colour-wheels-charts-and-tables-through-history/

 

I've picked out a handful of the various colour charts, colour wheels and other forms of colour illustrations for you – not all of them as that'd spoil the surprise when you visit the original post on : Colour Wheels, Charts, and Tables Through History

My favorite has to be this one below. It's just so gorgeous, and just so very olf, not to mention trying to visualise Richard Waller painstakingly creating this colour chart, or to be precise: Tabula Colorum Physiologica (1686)

 

Vintage Colour Wheels, Charts and Tables Through History

Richard Waller’s “Tabula Colorum Physiologica”, from “A Catalogue of Simple and Mixt Colours with a Specimen of Each Colour Prefixt Its Properties,” in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, vol. 6 for the years 1686 and 1687 (1688)

 

Vintage Colour Wheels, Charts and Tables Through History

Circular chart showing “complementary contrasts” from A Class-Book of Color: including color definitions, color scaling, and the harmony of colors (1895) by Mark Maycock

 

Vintage Colour Wheels, Charts and Tables Through History

Philipp Otto Runge’s Farbenkugel (1810). The top two images show the surface of the sphere, while the bottom two show horizontal and vertical cross sections

 

Vintage Colour Wheels, Charts and Tables Through History

Three plates from Robert Ridgeway’s Color Standards and Color Nomenclature (1912)

 

Vintage Colour Wheels, Charts and Tables Through History

Parsons' Spectrum Color Chart, an Illustration from The Principles of Advertising Arrangement (1912) by Frank Alvah Parsons

 

Vintage Colour Wheels, Charts and Tables Through History

Page from Priced catalogue of artists’ materials : supplies for oil painting, water color painting, china painting … and drawing materials for architects and engineers, manual training schools and colleges (1914)



Sony Playstation 1 Logo Design Ideas and Concepts

I know the Sony Playstation 1 Logo Design Ideas and Concepts isn't exactly breaking news, as it's been floating around for a while: http://imgur.com/qf2cSHU

I came across it again by accident the other, and I do like looking at all unused concepts for any branding project, then comparing them to the chosen one.

As a logo and graphic design, it's generally always heartening to see another designers/studios early logo concepts, as they are rarely works-of-art when compared to the final logo design.

I'm always looking back at my early logo design concepts and laughing at how awful they are.

Some of these early Sony Playstation 1 designs are interesting to say the least, but the whole process of exploring the shit early ideas generally leads you to eventual fame and glory.

Also check out the: Meaning Behind the Sony Vaio Logo

 

Sony Playstation 1 logo design ideas and concepts

The Sony Nintendo Playstation Console

Here is what the Sony PS1 was supposed to look like before Sony took it on without Nintendo.

Early-Sony-Playstation-1-console-concept



Erich Dieckmann: Design Development of a Metal Tube Chair

The Erich Dieckmann tube chair development illustration has been doing-the-rounds of late, and it's quite a interesting—at least to me—look into the design process way-back-then.

It's really way-back given Mr Dieckmann was born in 1986, and passed 1944.

Seems this particular illustration is from a rare book, titled: Erich Dieckmann - Möbelbau in Holz, Rohr und Stahl, which you can buy from Amazon for a thrifty £150.

More on the Bauhaus-Movement: architects and designers.

 

Erich-Dieckmann--Mobelbau-in-Holz-Rohr-und-Stahl

Erich Dieckmann Bio

Erich Dieckmann (1896-1944) studied architecture at Danzig Polytechnic from 1918 until 1920. After finishing the foundation course, however, he dropped out and went to Dresden, where he began to study painting and drawing. In 1921 he enrolled at the Bauhaus in Weimar. Between 1921 and 1925 Dieckmann served an apprenticeship there as a carpenter.

When the Bauhaus school moved to Dessau in 1925, he transferred to the Staatliche Bauhochschule in Weimar and was head of the carpentry workshop there from 1925 until 1930.

From 1931 until he was dismissed by the National Socialists in 1933, Erich Dieckmann was head of the carpentry workshop at the Kunstgewerbeschule Burg Giebichenstein in Halle.

From 1939 he lived in Berlin. Erich Dieckmann was one of the most important furniture designers at the Bauhaus, developing type ranges for seat furniture. Like Marcel Breuer, Erich Dieckmann experimented with steel tubing but is primarily known for his standardized wooden furniture. Dieckmann's designs for seat furniture are stringently geometric, with frames based on right angles and constructed of almost pieces of wood that were either almost square in cross section or flat; another feature typical of Dieckmann's work is linking armrests and chair legs in a runner construction.

By using quality hardwoods such as beech, cherry, oak, and ash as well as cane matting, Dieckmann loosened up the stringent geometry of his designs; on the other hand, however, standardization and normed proportions were to keep the prices of these mass-produced pieces of furniture as low as possible.



Color-Lisa-Color-Palettes-by-Claude-Monet-for-Graphic-Designers-1

Color Lisa: Curated List of Color Palettes Based on Masterpieces of the Worlds Greatest Artists by Ryan McGuire

I do love poking around all the various color palettes, and colour swatch libraries currently available online. I frequently visit such established colour palette websites as ColourLovers for inspiration for new logo design, and other graphic design projects.

Color Lisa is a tasty variation of existing color palette and swatch libraries, based on painted masterpieces of the worlds greatest artists, for us Graphic Designers. Color Lisa was made by Ryan McGuire, who also made the free photo image website, Gratisography.com

The Color Lisa website  is simple enough to get around; there's only one long page listing the artists from A-Z. Click M in the top list of letters from A-Z, and you'll jump down to Monet, for example.

Color-Lisa-Color-Palettes-by-Pablo-Picasso-for-Graphic-Designers-1

THE DREAM by Pablo Picasso

Color-Lisa-Color-Palettes-for-Graphic-Designers-1

RAINBOW by Bille Apple

Color-Lisa-Color-Palettes-for-Graphic-Designers

Color Lisa is a curated list of color palettes based on masterpieces of the worlds greatest artists. Each palette was painstakingly created by color obsessed designers, artists, museum curators, and masters of color theory. Palettes are constantly being added to help keep your designs colorful and fresh.

Color Lisa was made by Ryan McGuire, an artist, photographer, designer, and lover of color. Fun fact about Ryan: he drives a bright green (HEX #A5C955) and orange (HEX #E9AF42) 1971 VW Beetle he turned into a dinosaur. Questions, guest curator requests, and praise :) can be sent to [email protected].