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Granite Stationery PSD Mock-up: Free Logo & Brand Identity Mockup by Aaron Covrett


Granite Stationery: Logo & Brand Identity PSD Mockup by Aaron Covrett

Granite Stationery PSD Mock-up: Free Logo & Brand Identity Mockup by Aaron Covrett

There are plenty of brand identity themed stationery mock-up's available for free download, and for purchase, but Granite Stationery PSD Mock-up, designed by Aaron Corvette, really caught my eye.

There's definitely something about the monochrome and typographic theme that I'm liking with Granite, but I also appreciate the overall layout and that it was all put together in Cinema4d, and Octane Render:

Aaron Corvette: Granite Stationery is a mockup PSD bundle, free to use for commercial and personal use. All of the images presented were created in Cinema4d and rendered with Octane Render. I hope you'll find the collection helpful! Download the full pack for free.

Features of Granite Stationery:

Photoshop Files (PSD)
Change Background Color Easily
Transparent Shadows/Reflections
16-bit Color Depth
Fully Editable Layers
Edit Content via Smart Object Layers
Hi-Res 2500px * 1400px (300DPI)

 

I'm always looking out for fresh new mockup's to help me present my own logo and brand identity work to clients, so I'll certainly be using Granite in the future.

You can download Granite over on Aarons Behance Profile, and of course it's a FREE download!

Granite Stationery: Logo & Brand Identity PSD Mockup by Aaron Covrett

Granite Stationery Logo Brand Identity PSD Mockup by Aaron Covrett Granite Stationery: Logo & Brand Identity PSD Mockup by Aaron Covrett  Granite Stationery Logo Brand Identity PSD Mockup by Aaron Covrett Granite Stationery: Logo & Brand Identity PSD Mockup by Aaron Covrett

Granite Stationery Logo Brand Identity PSD Mockup by Aaron Covrett



Unrealised DC Metro Subway Map Designs by Massimo Vignelli


DC Metro Subway map designs Massimo Vignelli

Unrealised DC Metro Subway Map Designs by Massimo Vignelli

So this is all rather splendid! We get to see some of Massimo Vignelli Metro Subway Map ideas, even though they weren't actually used, it was Lance Wyman (check out Lance's website to see the logo work that he created (snapshot below) that ended up designing the DC Metro Maps.

Even though Massimo didn't get to do the maps, he did design the signage for the DC Metro Subway, so he absolutely managed to leave his mark!

If you are a fan of Massimo & Lella Vignelli's work, then you'll be fascinated by the official Tumblr for the Vignelli Centre:

design: Vignelli Featuring artefacts from the Massimo and Lella Vignelli papers as they are unpacked and processed at the Vignelli Centre for Design Studies.

 

Vignelli Centre for Design Studies

 

Found in the archives!

Unrealized DC Metro map designs. Although Massimo Vignelli, while at Unimark International, designed the signage for the Washington DC Metro subway in 1968, he didn’t design the map (which was designed by Lance Wyman).

But we recently uncovered a variety of ideas mocked up on these presentation boards. We also found some original sketches for the signage! Stay tuned!

Unrealised DC Metro Subway Map Designs by Massimo Vignelli

DC Metro Subway map designs Massimo Vignelli DC Metro Subway map designs Massimo Vignelli  DC Metro Subway map designs Massimo Vignelli DC Metro Subway map designs Massimo Vignelli DC Metro Subway map designs Massimo Vignelli DC Metro Subway map designs Massimo Vignelli DC Metro Subway map designs Massimo Vignelli DC Metro Subway map designs Massimo Vignelli DC Metro Subway map designs Massimo Vignelli



Rediscovering the Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines Notebook by Arun Venkatesan


Rediscovering the Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines Notebook

Rediscovering the Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines Notebook, by Arun Venkatesan, is a must read if you have any kind of interest in both Apple as a company, it's history, branding, and design in general.

Even if you're not a fan of Apple as a company, but respect solid brand identity design, then this is essential reading.

Arun Venkatesan has done a bang-up job of finding, purchasing and reviewing the original Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines, belonging to one of the most famous companies in living history.

What's so amazing, at least for me, is that I grow-up with Apple and remember well this design style. I still have my original Apple Macintosh Color Classic on my work desk…

Reading Arun's commentary, and looking at the beautiful photographs he has taken of the Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines Notebook, makes me realise how even back then, Apple had a tight grasp of design and branding.

Here's just a few of the photographs from Arun's post: Rediscovering Apple's 1987 Identity Guidelines

 

Rediscovering the Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines Notebook

Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines Notebook

 

Rediscovering Apple's 1987 Identity Guidelines: "My copy of Apple’s Identity Guidelines was made in 1987, a year notable for Reagan’s “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!” speech in Berlin and the release of Bad by Michael Jackson. Only two years earlier, Steve Jobs had been ousted from Apple. A year before that in 1984, the first Macintosh was released. Another 7 years earlier in 1977 was when the now famous 6 color rainbow Apple logo first appeared.

Apple was very different back then. It distantly trailed its competitors in sales, marketshare, revenue and market capitalization. It was still a decade away from its shift towards the multimedia market that ultimately culminated in Apple’s transition into the household brand it is today.

Being able to peek into that Apple is what makes this poster so interesting."

 

Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines Notebook

Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines

Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines Notebook

Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines Notebook  

Apple Corporate Identity Guidelines Notebook



Super Rare Design Book: Designing Programmes by Karl Gerstner to be Republished


This bit of design news has me all super excited, and it's been sometime since I could enthusiastically say I was super excited about a design book. This super news is that the super super rare book, "Designing Programmes" by Karl Gerstner, first published in 1964, is to be republished by Lars Müller.

Not only is it being republished, but it's being done so in it's original design format and style; not like the redesigned version in 2007:

 

Super Rare

The First Edition and Second Edition are both super rare, with the First Edition being almost completely unavailable, unless you're willing to invest thousands of pounds on a copy:

What I learned from the $2,000 elusive design book “Designing Programmes”

The Second Edition, the redesigned version, can be found if you're keen enough.

So the news that Lars Müller is republishing the First Edition exactly as is, in hardback, and for only £30.00, is really rather exciting.

I've preordered my copy on Amazon, and I'd encourage you to do the same…

designing-Programmes-karl-gerstner-6

 

Super Rare Design Book: Designing Programmes by Karl Gerstner to be Republished

designing Programmes karl gerstner

 

Swiss designer and artist Karl Gerstner (1930-2017) had a significant influence on typography and the history and development of postwar graphic design. Designing Programmes is one of his most important and influential works.

It was first published in 1964, and reissued in a new design by Lars Müller Publishers in 2007; both editions are now rare (the first almost completely unavailable). Now, Lars Müller reissues the book with its original design.

Here, across four essays, Gerstner provides a basic introduction to his design methodology and suggests a model for design in the early days of the computer era. Gerstner's innovation was to propose a rule set or system defined by the designer that would determine all aesthetic decisions for a given product: for example, a logo might also function as a layout grid system or inspire a font.

Today the book is especially topical in the context of current developments in computational design. With many examples from the worlds of graphic and product design, music, architecture and art, Designing Programmes inspires the reader to seize on the material, develop it further, and integrate it into his or her own work.

 

designing Programmes karl gerstner   designing Programmes karl gerstner

designing Programmes karl gerstner



1934 Chart of the Evolution in Design designed by Raymond Loewy


Raymond Loewy’s 1934 Chart of the Evolution in Design is simply a wonderful thing to look at; particularly love the Automobiles and Rail Car design evolutions.

Notice the very last entry, bottom right. The level of detail is marvellous; it's like a vintage infographic, but not…

 

Raymond Loewy’s 1934 chart of the evolution in design

Timeline Chart version by MacRae Linton

To further expand upon this evolution in design chart, MacRae Linton adjusted it into a timeline chart, after seeing it featured on Kottke, which further add's a further practical dimension to it.

 

Raymond Loewy’s 1934 chart of the evolution in design



Record Label Logo Designs – A Monster Logo Compilation by Reagan Ray


Record Label Logo Designs A Monster Logo Compilation by Reagan Ray

Record Label Logo Design - A Monster Logo Compilation by Reagan Ray

This record label logo compilation has surely got to be one of the largest logo compilations out there? Reagan has done an incredibly job of sourcing these record label logos, and then presenting them in a clean and simple fashion.

Quite a few of these are familiar, but I'd certainly say the majority are not!

I've just picked out a handful to post here, so please do head over to Reagan's website and view the entire collection for your self.

From Reagan's own words:

"This was a beast of a post to put together. In my other logo posts, I was dealing with hundreds of brands. With record labels, it's in the thousands. If you include indie and foreign labels, I feel like I could have spent the next few years trying to track down and organize all the label logos out there. Halfway through, I almost decided to split it up by either decade or genre, but it was just too daunting.

So after tons of browsing (thanks 45cat!), I’ve managed to curate what I think is the cream of the crop. I’ve mostly stuck to the major labels, with some off-beat stuff mixed in. As with most logo collections I’ve put together, the oldies (and nostalgia) rule the day. If there's a great one I missed, hit me up on twitter and let me know about it. Enjoy!"

 

Record Label Logo Designs

Record Label Logo Designs A Monster Logo Compilation by Reagan Ray Record Label Logo Designs A Monster Logo Compilation by Reagan Ray Record Label Logo Designs A Monster Logo Compilation by Reagan Ray Record Label Logo Designs A Monster Logo Compilation by Reagan Ray Record Label Logo Designs A Monster Logo Compilation by Reagan Ray Record Label Logo Designs A Monster Logo Compilation by Reagan Ray

Record Label Logo Designs A Monster Logo Compilation by Reagan Ray

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Huge Map Showing Locations of Major Japanese Brands


So this is a BIG thing. Someone unknown has created this epic map of Japan with strategically placed brand logos of each major Japanese company. It seems the map was designed in 2013, and I found it via Reddit which was linked to RonnieRocket.com 

This image below clicks to the full-size version at 1784px x 1920px.

Huge Map Showing Locations of Major Japanese Brands

map of major japanese brands



Social Decay Brand Logo Series Designed by Andrei Lacatusu


Social Decay, designed by CGI Artist Andrei Lacatusu, has created these ultra realistic vintage inspired signs of decaying famous social media brand logos.

This has to be one of the most inspiring, and visually compelling, brand logo studies I've ever seen.

This is truly some astonishing 'creative' work, not to mention the reasoning behind it all.

Urge you to list Andrei's Behance project page, and look at some of the other images he's uploaded, that look at each of these in closer detail.

Found via FastCompanyDesign

Social Decay Brand Logo Series Designed by Andrei Lacatusu

pinterest social decay logo designed by Andrei Lacatusu

facebook social decay logo designed by Andrei Lacatusu instagram social decay logo designed by Andrei Lacatusu tinder social decay logo designed by Andrei Lacatusu google social decay logo designed by Andrei Lacatusu twitter social decay logo designed by Andrei Lacatusu

social decay logo designed by Andrei Lacatusu

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The New Formula 1 Logo & Brand ID Promo Video by Wieden Kennedy


 

Watch the original The New Formula 1 Logo & Brand ID Promo Video, by Wieden Kennedy, over on their Instagram

Thank you to Gariphic for the tip.



Vision: Free Font Family Designed by Pixel Surplus & Bydani


Vision free font family designed by Pixel Surplus and Bydani

 

The Free font family, Vision, designed by Pixel Surplus and Bydani, has six weights and support for thirty languages.

If you like your geometric-humanist sans styles of fonts and typefaces, then Vision should see you OK.

H/T to Notes on Design

–> Download Vision Font Family

Specifications

Vision has six weights to choose from; support for 30 languages; creative and stylish OpenType features, including: stylistic variations, standard and discretional ligatures, and unique numerators and denominators.

Font License

Vision is Free for Personal Use, but a donation to Bydani is always appreciated. If you want to use this for commercial applications, then I'd suggest contacting Pixel Surplus and Bydani, and seek their permission.

Free Font Family Designed by Pixel Surplus & Bydani

Vision free font family designed by Pixel Surplus and Bydani Vision free font family designed by Pixel Surplus and Bydani Vision free font family designed by Pixel Surplus and Bydani Vision free font family designed by Pixel Surplus and Bydani

–> Download Vision Font Family

Vision free font family designed by Pixel Surplus and Bydani