The Logo Smith https://imjustcreative.com The Logo Smith - Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio Fri, 25 Sep 2020 16:36:58 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://imjustcreative.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-favicon-1-32x32.png The Logo Smith https://imjustcreative.com 32 32 Famous Logo Designs and their accompanying Final Logo Design Sketches & Napkin Doodles https://imjustcreative.com/logo-sketches/2020/09/24 Thu, 24 Sep 2020 10:49:34 +0000 https://imjustcreative.com/?p=34401 The post Famous Logo Designs and their accompanying Final Logo Design Sketches & Napkin Doodles appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

Arek Dvornechuck has compiled a post showing famous logo sketches, and napkin doodle sketches, for various famous brands and companies. There are plenty of blog posts that show…

The post Famous Logo Designs and their accompanying Final Logo Design Sketches & Napkin Doodles appeared first on The Logo Smith - The Logo Smith - Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio | The The Logo Smith is a Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio with over 28 Years Experience: Logo & Brand Identity; Website Design, Graphic Design, & Typography & Advertising | All Content © 2020 TheLogoSmith.co :)

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The post Famous Logo Designs and their accompanying Final Logo Design Sketches & Napkin Doodles appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

Arek Dvornechuck has compiled a post showing famous logo sketches, and napkin doodle sketches, for various famous brands and companies.

There are plenty of blog posts that show one or some of these famous logo sketches, but this is a post puts the logo sketch up along-side the final logo design.

During some digging around for this I also came across some other blog posts that have other famous logo designs with their accompanying logo sketches, so have included these as well.

Some of the bonus logo sketches include: Firefox, Univision, Hartford Whalers, Starbucks, CN, ITV and Atari.

As a little extra: I’ve used this post as an opportunity to write a little bit about logo design sketching in general, so read on / jump past the Famous Logo Design Sketches below to find out more!


I Love New York Logo Sketch Designed by Milton Glaser

iloveny napkin doodle sketch
I Love NY Logo Designed by Milton Glaser (via MOMA)

Milton Glaser drew the iconic I Love New York campaign logo way back in 1976 on an envelope, in the back of a taxi, with a red crayon.

What you might not know is that Milton requested no payment for his I Love NY logo design.

It’s also why I never leave home without my red crayon.

Watch: Big Think Interview with Milton Glaser


Citibank Logo Sketches Designed by Paula Scher

citibank napkin doodle sketch the logo smith
Citibank Logo Designed by Paula Scher (via Pentagram)

Before the Pentragram team could get to work they met with Citibank leadership to discuss their challenges and what they were hoping to get out of the engagement.

As she listened Paula started to idly doodle on a napkin, and said:

“This is your logo.”

Read More: The $1.5m napkin: Paula Scher’s 5 minute logo


Firefox Logo Sketch Designed by Stephen Desroches

Firefox Logo Sketch Designed by Stephen Desroches, Rendered by Jon Hicks.

Stephen Desroches created the original sketch, and the final design was rendered using Fireworks by Jon Hicks.

Jon Hicks: “The final chosen design was a concept from Daniel Burka and sketched by Stephen Desroches, which I then rendered using Fireworks MX. I’ve been using Fireworks over Illustrator or Photoshop for icon design as I love the way I can work in vectors and see the result in pixels, rather than smooth vectors. The updated gradient tools in MX make this possible too.

https://hicks.design/journal/branding-firefox

Read More: Branding Firefox by Jon Hicks

From the Mozilla Digital Memory Bank

Mozilla Digital Memory Bank (DMB): “The sketch on the left was created by Stephen DesRoches of silverorange on Prince Edward Island in Canada. The concept was created by Stephen DesRoches, Daniel Burka, and myself along with input from a team of artists from around the world.

In December of 2003, Stephen, Daniel, and I were throwing around ideas for the logo and drew a silly little sketch of the basic shape on a white board at our office.

Stephen DesRoches then took this concept and drew the pencil-sketch shown here. We scanned this sketch and posted it to the other artists working with us.

Only three hours later, Jon Hicks, and illustrator and designer from the United Kingdom responded with his rendering of the concept drawn in Macromedia Fireworks.

This concept was then refined over a matter of months into what became the final Firefox icon and logo.”

http://mozillamemory.org/
Firefox logo sketch by Stephen DesRoches

CN Logo Napkin Doodle Designed by Allan Fleming

CN Logo Napkin Doodle Designed by Allan Fleming

After experimenting with countless possibilities, Fleming hit on a particularly inspired design while sitting on a New York-bound airplane.

He quickly sketched the idea on a cocktail napkin – and CN’s logo was conceived.

While conceptualizing the future, Fleming drew on the past for the kind of image that would convey timelessness. Studying the Christian cross and the Egyptian symbol for life, he borrowed the idea of using a line of single thickness. “The single thickness stoke is what makes the symbol live,” Fleming later said. “Anything else would lack the immediacy and vigor.”

The continuous flowing line symbolized “the movement of people, materials, and messages from one point to another,” Fleming said. As the eye moves from “C” to “N”, the image suggests fluidity and motion. “It’s a route line that incidentally spells CN,” Fleming explained.

But let’s leave the last word to designer Allan Fleming, who unfortunately would not live to see his own prophecy borne out. He died in 1977, just 17 years after observing:

“I think this symbol will last for 50 years at least.

It don’t think it will need any revision, simply because it is designed with the future in mind.

Its very simplicity guarantees its durability.”

Allan Fleming

Read More: CN Logo Designed by Allan Fleming


Univision Logo Sketch Designed by Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv

Univision Logo Sketch
Univision Logo Designed by Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv

“The [Univision] mark is derived from the initial letter U in the company name and is broken up into four colorful panes.

The top left pane, which is identical to the lower forms but flipped on its side, gives the mark its unique character.

While overall the form is clearly a U, the flipped pane also makes it into a colorful abstract bird or flower.”

Chermayeff Geismar Haviv 60 Years

Read more: 60 years of Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv


Virgin Logo Napkin Doodle Designed by a ‘young designer’

Virgin Logo Designed by a ‘young designer on a houseboat’

Mr Branson: “It looked like a signature. It had attitude. It had energy. It was in-your-face simplistic.”

Read More: The Virgin Logo and the Napkin Doodle

Virgin Logo Design Napkin Doodle

Mobil Logo Designed by Chermayeff & Geismar

mobil
Mobil Logo Designed by Chermayeff & Geismar

Chermayeff & Geismar decided upon a clean break from the previous Mobil logos and created a radically simplified design.

The idea of the red ‘o’ came about partly to reinforce a design concept to use circular canopies, pumps and displays elements which Mobil was installing at its fuel stations at the time.

It was also used to help people pronounce the name correctly (Mo-bil, not Mo-bile).

Read More: Mobil by www.cghnyc.com


WWF Logo by Gerald Watterson & Sir Peter Scott

wwf
WWF Logo by Gerald Watterson & Sir Peter Scott

British environmentalist and artist Gerald Watterson played a key role in the original panda logo by producing the initial sketches.

The inspiration for our logo came from Chi-Chi: a giant panda that arrived at London Zoo in 1961 – the same year that WWF was created.

Aware of the need for a recognisable symbol that would overcome all language barriers, WWF’s founders agreed that the big, furry bear with her distinctive black and white coat would make a great logo.

The first sketches were done by the British environmentalist and artist, Gerald Watterson.

Based on these, Sir Peter Scott, one of our founders, drew the first logo. He said at the time that “we wanted an animal that is beautiful, endangered, and loved by many people in the world for its appealing qualities. We also wanted an animal that had an impact in black and white to save money on printing costs.”

Read More: What is the story behind WWF’s panda logo?


Nike Logo Designed by Carolyn Davidson

nike
Nike logo Designed by Carolyn Davidson (via Print Magazine)

The Nike Swoosh was designed by graphic designer Carolyn Davidson in 1971.

Her invoice total for this important piece of design history? $35.

Read More: The $35 Nike Logo and the Woman Who Designed It

Nike Logo Sketch Designed by Carolyn Davidson

itv Logo Sketches Designed by Rudd Studio

itv Logo Sketches Designed by Rudd Studio

Matt Rudd of Rudd Studio, explains on LogoDesignLove:

I wanted the ITV logo to get off the fence and stand for something. Alongside the informative BBC and the provocative Channel 4, ITV is friendly and warm. It brings about shared emotional experiences.

I felt that the logo should be based on handwriting, and that the letters might be lower case and joined up.

https://www.logodesignlove.com/itv-logo

Read More: ITV logo creation, by Rudd Studio

itv Logo Sketches Designed by Rudd Studio
itv Logo Sketches Designed by Rudd Studio

Exxon Logo Sketches Designed by Raymond Loewy

exxon napkin doodle
Exxon Logo Designed by Raymond Loewy (via Library of Congress)

In Raymond Loewy’s 1966 Exxon Mobile logo process sketch, he visually emphasized the concept of the double “x’s” and created 18 variations of it.

He chose one, marking it it with an “OK.”

Read More: Full logo history on the ExxonMobile website.

Exxon Logo Napkin Doodle Sketch by Raymond Loew

Chase Logo Designed by Tom Gesimar

chasebank napkin doodle
Chase Logo Designed by Tom Gesimar

Tom Gesimar, in his interview:

“The hard task the designer faces is trying to help the client see how the logo might eventually be perceived, how it will work for them, not just whether they ‘like it’.

He then goes onto explain how this worked with the Chase logo presentation, or didn’t work:

“We learned this lesson early on when we first presented the Chase symbol to the chief executives of the bank. The man who was then Chairman said he would go along the decision of the others, but personally he hated it and did not want to see it on his letterhead his business card, or anywhere in his office.

Six months later we ran into him at the bank. He was wearing a pin with the symbol in his lapel, and a tie-tack with the symbol holding a tie that was itself a pattern of the symbol. To him, the mark was no longer just an abstract design, it had become the representation of his organization.”

→ An interview with Tom Geismar smith.gl/302jaej

Read More: An interview with Tom Geismar

Chase Logo Napkin Doodle Sketch Designed by Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv

Atari Logo Designed by George Opperman

Atari Logo Designed by George Opperman

The Atari logo was designed by George Opperman in 1972, after the huge success of the game Pong. 

George Opperman: ”the two side pieces of the Atari symbol represents two opposing video game players, with the center line of the ‘Pong’ court in the middle.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Opperman

Read More: The Atari Logo: Behind the Fuji

The Atari logo was designed by George Opperman in 1972

Starbucks Logo Designed by Terry Heckler

Starbucks Logo Designed by Terry Heckler

A 15th century woodcut of a Norse two-tailed mermaid was the original inspiration for Starbucks’ logo.

The logo sketches and ink drawings of the newly updated Starbucks logo, by designer Terry Heckler, shows how the mermaid has evolved over the years.

Read More: Brand Stories


Hartford Whalers Logo Design Sketches by Peter Good

Hartford Whalers Logo Designed by Peter Good

There’s a more detailed article, including a video of an interview with Peter Good about the logo process, and the development of the Hartford Whalers logo, over at: icethetics.co

Here’s a part of the interview where Peter talks about the inclusion of the initial H, which was not originally part of the design brief:

DENNIS HOUSE: And so you started sketching?
PETER GOOD: This is where all design projects start. Those are the original designs that I presented not as a design solution but as a way of thinking about the identity.
Curiously, when I did these, Howard Baldwin actually said, “I like the lower right one.” Shown here. With the trident. The trident was a reference to the harpoons.
I said, “Why do you like that one?” He said, “The ‘H’ is there.” So I said, “Wait a minute, that was a not a requirement. It was just an idea that I had. But now that I know that it limits the field. So let me have another three or four days to play with it, to go back and rethink this given the idea it should have the ‘H’ integrated.

Read More: How the Timeless Hartford Whalers Logo Came to be

Hartford Whalers Logo design sketches

My Thoughts On Logo Design Sketching and Napkin Doodles

The subject of logo sketching always pops up from time-to-time, and it usually revolves around designers not feeling confident that their ‘sketching’ game is up-to-speed.

If you ever worry about how your sketches look to your clients: maybe you’re worried your it isn’t neat enough, or you only had some tatty used paper to whip-up that eureka moment, or you just have a bewildering selection of rough pencil doodles mixed-up together and it just looks messy…

There is absolutely no wrong way to do sketches.

As you can see from the 8 examples above, from: Milton Glaser, Tom Geismar, Paula Scher, Raymond Loewy, Chermayeff & Geismar each one looks pretty rough, with Mobil and Chase being the exception to the rule.

Try not to over think how you sketch.

The most important thing is capturing the logo design idea so you don’t forget it!

On what you sketch it, and with what you sketch it, is entirely irrelevant.

If you’re still a little worried about showing your logo sketches to your clients, then you can simply pre empty it by explaining your logo design process to your client (or having a handy FAQ page). You can then better prepare your client for the presentation of rough logo design sketches, or napkin doodles.

I make sure that I tell my new clients that any sketches I show them are exactly that; rough sketches, and are to show the proposed idea before spending time in Illustrator.

My own sketches are notoriously rough looking, and the one for Pure Storage is a prime example of this:

pure storage logo sketch designed by the-logo-smith
Pure Storage Logo Design Ideas and Napkin Doodle Sketches The logo design process
Pure Storage Logo Design Ideas and Sketches The logo design process
Pure Storage
Pure Storage Logo Designed by The Logo Smith

The Napkin Doodle

I will often drop in the phrase “napkin doodle”, as this gives a better sense of what a client can expect.

Napkin Doodle conveys the more rushed and unprepared nature of suddenly coming up with an idea when you are eating, or somewhere other than your studio, and finding the closest thing to draw the sketch on.

The Virgin logo is famous for the napkin doodle sketch, and is a great example to show your clients if you’re worried about being unfairly judged on the quality of your logo sketches.

Virgin Logo Design Napkin Doodle
Virgin Napkin Doodle Sketch

Some of my past clients don’t seem to believe me when I say napkin doodles can often lead to the final chosen logo design.

In Virgin’s case, it was a young designer who came to meet Mr Virgin on his houseboat, and whilst talking about about the logo, scribbled what you see on the napkin.

And that was it, it was love at first sight!

Mr Branson: “It looked like a signature. It had attitude. It had energy. It was in-your-face simplistic.”

This original Virgin logo sketch became the official brand mark of Virgin in 1979, and has since disrupted everything from air-travel, to banking, health clubs and hotels.


To Sum Up on Logo Sketching

Milton Glaser famously sketched the I Love NY logo idea in a taxi cab; Paula Scher sketched the Citibank idea in 5 minutes also on a napkin doodle; Raymond Loewy came up with seventy-six rough pencil sketches; the Virgin logo idea was quickly sketched on a paper napkin during the discovery phase, on a house boat!

If famous designers, or even unfamous designers who created famous logos, can use a napkin doodle and show that to their client, then you certainly can as well.

As I mentioned above; just try not to overthink the sketching process.

The creation and capturing of the idea is the most important thing!

logo napkin doodle header

The post Famous Logo Designs and their accompanying Final Logo Design Sketches & Napkin Doodles appeared first on The Logo Smith - The Logo Smith - Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio | The The Logo Smith is a Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio with over 28 Years Experience: Logo & Brand Identity; Website Design, Graphic Design, & Typography & Advertising | All Content © 2020 TheLogoSmith.co :)

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Vintage Czechoslovakian Matchbox Labels on Uncut Sheets Collected by Kindra Murphy https://imjustcreative.com/czechoslovakian-matchbox-labels/2020/09/23 Wed, 23 Sep 2020 10:44:00 +0000 https://imjustcreative.com/?p=34372 The post Vintage Czechoslovakian Matchbox Labels on Uncut Sheets Collected by Kindra Murphy appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

A staggering Flickr collection of Czechoslovakian Matchbox Labels on Uncut Sheets, collected by Kindra Murphy, primarily from the 1950’s and 1960’s. Such a varied selection of Czechoslovakian Matchbox…

The post Vintage Czechoslovakian Matchbox Labels on Uncut Sheets Collected by Kindra Murphy appeared first on The Logo Smith - The Logo Smith - Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio | The The Logo Smith is a Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio with over 28 Years Experience: Logo & Brand Identity; Website Design, Graphic Design, & Typography & Advertising | All Content © 2020 TheLogoSmith.co :)

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The post Vintage Czechoslovakian Matchbox Labels on Uncut Sheets Collected by Kindra Murphy appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

A staggering Flickr collection of Czechoslovakian Matchbox Labels on Uncut Sheets, collected by Kindra Murphy, primarily from the 1950’s and 1960’s.

Such a varied selection of Czechoslovakian Matchbox styles here, covering so many areas of industry, social, transport, life, animals etc.

It’s also cool to see them all up on these uncut sheets, and where possible Kindra has also noted the Factory responsible for each one.


→ Kindra is also responsible for the even more beautiful collection of Milwaukee Bus Passes:

Czechoslovakian Matchbox Labels Collected by Kindra Murphy

Czech Matchbox Labels: 'Led by the Communist Party Clergy against Fascism and Nazism'.
Subject: ‘Led by the Communist Party Clergy against Fascism and Nazism’.
Factory: Unknown.
Subject: ‘Airlines’.
Factory: Solo Susice
Subject: Hotel/Bar.
Factory: Solo Susice
Czech Matchbox Labels: 'Metrostav / Construction, Iron, Railway...'. Factory: Solo Susice
Subject: ‘Metrostav / Construction, Iron, Railway…’.
Factory: Solo Susice
Subject: 1948 Czechoslovakia coup d’état.
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Subject: ‘Recycle scrapmetal’.
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Subject: ‘Household products: varnish, wood flooring, insulation, etc.’
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Czech matchbox labels (uncut sheet): 'Škoda automobile manufacturer'. 
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Subject: ‘Škoda automobile manufacturer’.
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Czech Matchbox Labels: 'Gas/Propane'. 
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Subject: ‘Gas/Propane’.
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Czech Matchbox Labels (uncut sheet). 
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Czech Matchbox Labels (uncut sheet): 'From the professionals in specialized stores'. 
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Subject: ‘From the professionals in specialized stores’.
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Czech Matchbox Labels (uncut sheet). 
Factory: Solo Lipnik
Factory: Solo Lipnik

Czechoslovakia, or Czecho-Slovakia was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from October 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until its peaceful dissolution into the Czech Republic and Slovakia on 1 January 1993.

From 1939 to 1945, following its forced division and partial incorporation into Nazi Germany, the state did not de facto exist but its government-in-exile continued to operate.

From 1948 to 1990, Czechoslovakia was part of the Eastern Bloc with a command economy. Its economic status was formalized in membership of Comecon from 1949 and its defense status in the Warsaw Pact of May 1955. A period of political liberalization in 1968, known as the Prague Spring, was forcibly ended when the Soviet Union, assisted by several other Warsaw Pact countries, invaded Czechoslovakia. In 1989, as Marxist–Leninist governments and communism were ending all over Europe, Czechoslovaks peacefully deposed their government in the Velvet Revolution; state price controls were removed after a period of preparation.

In 1993, Czechoslovakia split into the two sovereign states of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czechoslovakia

The post Vintage Czechoslovakian Matchbox Labels on Uncut Sheets Collected by Kindra Murphy appeared first on The Logo Smith - The Logo Smith - Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio | The The Logo Smith is a Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio with over 28 Years Experience: Logo & Brand Identity; Website Design, Graphic Design, & Typography & Advertising | All Content © 2020 TheLogoSmith.co :)

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DUNE Hardcover Artwork of the Penguin Classics Hardback Version of Frank Herbert’s Classic Book Designed by Alex Trochut https://imjustcreative.com/dune-hardcover-artwork-penguin-classics/2020/09/17 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 11:46:53 +0000 https://imjustcreative.com/?p=34360 The post DUNE Hardcover Artwork of the Penguin Classics Hardback Version of Frank Herbert’s Classic Book Designed by Alex Trochut appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

Stunning artwork, design and typography, by Alex Trochut, for The Penguin Classics DUNE Hardcover version of DUNE by Frank Herbert. The version of the DUNE logo on the…

The post DUNE Hardcover Artwork of the Penguin Classics Hardback Version of Frank Herbert’s Classic Book Designed by Alex Trochut appeared first on The Logo Smith - The Logo Smith - Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio | The The Logo Smith is a Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio with over 28 Years Experience: Logo & Brand Identity; Website Design, Graphic Design, & Typography & Advertising | All Content © 2020 TheLogoSmith.co :)

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The post DUNE Hardcover Artwork of the Penguin Classics Hardback Version of Frank Herbert’s Classic Book Designed by Alex Trochut appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

Stunning artwork, design and typography, by Alex Trochut, for The Penguin Classics DUNE Hardcover version of DUNE by Frank Herbert.

The version of the DUNE logo on the back of the DUNE Hardcover is particularlay beautiful, and a tiny bit cunning.

Which ever way you read it it reads DUNE, and that Gold Embossing really really looks good.

Also interesting that the DUNE logo differs on the front to that on the back. The front cover version using upper-case versions of DUNE whereas the slightly clever back cover version is using the lower-case style.

Both really are magnificent!

DUNE Back Cover Artwork of the Penguin Classics Hardback Version of Frank Herbert's Classic Book Designed by Alex Trochut

A deluxe hardcover edition of the best-selling science-fiction book of all time–part of Penguin Galaxy, a collectible series of six sci-fi/fantasy classics, featuring a series introduction by Neil Gaiman

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dune-Penguin-Galaxy-Frank-Herbert/
DUNE Back Cover Artwork of the Penguin Classics Hardback Version of Frank Herbert's Classic Book Designed by Alex Trochut
DUNE Back Cover Artwork of the Penguin Classics Hardback Version of Frank Herbert's Classic Book Designed by Alex Trochut

Winner of the AIGA + Design Observer 50 Books – 50 Covers competition

Science fiction’s supreme masterpiece, Dune will be forever considered a triumph of the imagination. Set on the desert planet Arrakis, it is the story of the boy Paul Atreides, who will become the mysterious man known as Muad’Dib.

Paul’s noble family is named stewards of Arrakis, whose sands are the only source of a powerful drug called “the spice.” After his family is brought down in a traitorous plot, Paul must go undercover to seek revenge, and to bring to fruition humankind’s most ancient and unattainable dream.

A stunning blend of adventure and mysticism, environmentalism and politics, Dune won the first Nebula Award, shared the Hugo Award, and formed the basis of what is undoubtedly the grandest epic in science fiction.

DUNE Back Cover Artwork of the Penguin Classics Hardback Version of Frank Herbert's Classic Book Designed by Alex Trochut
DUNE Back Cover Artwork of the Penguin Classics Hardback Version of Frank Herbert's Classic Book Designed by Alex Trochut

About Alex Trochut

Alex Trochut was born in 1981 in Barcelona, Spain. After completing his studies at Elisava Escola Superior de Disseny, Alex established his own design studio in Barcelona before relocating to New York City.

Through his design, illustration and typographic practice he has developed an intuitive way of working that has resulted in his expressive visual style.

For Alex, typography functions on two hierarchical levels. First, there is the image of the word we see; reading comes secondary. As a designer, Alex focuses on the potential of language as a visual medium, pushing language to its limits so that seeing and reading become the same action and text and image become one unified expression.

The post DUNE Hardcover Artwork of the Penguin Classics Hardback Version of Frank Herbert’s Classic Book Designed by Alex Trochut appeared first on The Logo Smith - The Logo Smith - Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio | The The Logo Smith is a Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio with over 28 Years Experience: Logo & Brand Identity; Website Design, Graphic Design, & Typography & Advertising | All Content © 2020 TheLogoSmith.co :)

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On being Ditched by your Logo Design Client https://imjustcreative.com/being-ditched-by-your-client/2020/09/16 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 10:02:05 +0000 https://imjustcreative.com/?p=34354 The post On being Ditched by your Logo Design Client appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

Being ditched by your client isn’t a subject not many of us logo and graphic designers would care to talk about, but it happens, and it happens a…

The post On being Ditched by your Logo Design Client appeared first on The Logo Smith - The Logo Smith - Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio | The The Logo Smith is a Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio with over 28 Years Experience: Logo & Brand Identity; Website Design, Graphic Design, & Typography & Advertising | All Content © 2020 TheLogoSmith.co :)

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The post On being Ditched by your Logo Design Client appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

Being ditched by your client isn’t a subject not many of us logo and graphic designers would care to talk about, but it happens, and it happens a lot.

Q: Is it just me, or does it happen to other designers?
A: No, it’s not just you. Far far far from it.

Being dumped by a client has happened to me a number of times in my logo design career, and I also know it’s happened a number of times to other logo designers that I know of.

I also know being ditched by a client has happened to those amazingly talented wellknown designers who you probably feel are incapable of doing any wrong.

Sometimes you don’t need to had done anything wrong to be ditched.

Being ditched happens to new designers; it happens to seasoned designers, and it happens to large agencies and studios.

Being ditched by a client happens to all of us.

The reasons are many, and varied, and sometimes there are no obvious reasons.

  • Sometimes it can be feel totally unjust, especially if you know you’ve busted a gut and spilt blood and tears trying to impress your client.
  • Sometimes you just know you haven’t done your best, and you go with the flow.
  • Sometimes you’re not even ditched, but seemingly ghosted:

The client just seems to lose interest, and doesn’t’ reply to any emails or provides any more feedback. There’s just silence where the days turn into weeks, and weeks into months. All the time you’re left wondering…

  • Sometimes we have a personal challenges going on meaning your mind is preoccupied, but we still need to take clients in order to pay those bills:

That’s the hard one to try and make peace with; knowing you desperately need to say Yes to taking on that logo project, but also know you’re likely not going to be able to be 100% there for your client, so you just hope beyond hope that by some luck of the creative Gods, you are able to muster on through and complete the project with a happy client.

But it doesn’t happen that way, and you end up being ditched… and boom goes your self esteem, your pride and convincing yourself you must be the only designer to have been ditched.

You are NOT the only designer this happens too!

It literally does happen to all of us, and if it hasn’t happened to you yet, then it’ll likely happen at some point:

Not necessarily due to anything you have or haven’t done, but likely down to something out of your creative control, leaving you totally baffled and confused.

You’d not be alone with that one, and when it happens just know it’s happening all over the world and to each and every one of us.

I have been on the receiving end of being ditched, and I’ve also been the designer hired by a client 1 who has just ditched their last designer.

So it also happens both ways; you can be the unfortunate victim, but also the fortunate saviour. I reckon it all balances out in the end.

Just handle the client/designer break-up with grace, try not to burn any bridges, and move on to the next project.


Reduce the Risk

Sometimes this break-up can be a pretty bad experience, especially if money is owed by the client, or any other number of practical and monetary complications caused by an unexpected end-of-project: money owed, projects you’ve turned down thinking you’d not have the time, scheduling nightmares, etc.

  • Having a contract can help in some of these cases, and it’s worth looking at having one if you don’t already.
  • It’s worth having some kind of Professional Indemnity Insurance, which I have courtesy of WithJack. I’ve had to rely on this insurance, and I wouldn’t be without it, so I’d strongly advise this your next to-do.


1. Pure Storage had initially approached me first, but my quote was too high. They tried with several designers, and even a logo design contest website, before coming back to hire me.

Pure Storage Logo Design Formula 1
Pure Storage Logo & Brand Identity Designed by The Logo Smith

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A Designers Hippocratic Oath x4 facilitated by Minni Bredou @mbredouw and devised by her Students https://imjustcreative.com/a-designers-hippocratic-oath/2020/09/14 Mon, 14 Sep 2020 11:30:47 +0000 https://imjustcreative.com/?p=34343 The post A Designers Hippocratic Oath x4 facilitated by Minni Bredou @mbredouw and devised by her Students appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

Recently came across this feel-good tweet on The Designers Hippocratic Oaths aka Design Manifesto, Design Code of Ethics,- tweeted by the students teacher, Minnie Bredouw: I had meant…

The post A Designers Hippocratic Oath x4 facilitated by Minni Bredou @mbredouw and devised by her Students appeared first on The Logo Smith - The Logo Smith - Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio | The The Logo Smith is a Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio with over 28 Years Experience: Logo & Brand Identity; Website Design, Graphic Design, & Typography & Advertising | All Content © 2020 TheLogoSmith.co :)

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The post A Designers Hippocratic Oath x4 facilitated by Minni Bredou @mbredouw and devised by her Students appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

Recently came across this feel-good tweet on The Designers Hippocratic Oaths aka Design Manifesto, Design Code of Ethics,- tweeted by the students teacher, Minnie Bredouw:

Credit: https://twitter.com/mbredouw/status/1224527535175692288

I had meant to blog about The Designers Hippocratic Oath soon after, but it ended further and further down in my blog post to do list.

Bear in mind these are from young students; not fully life weary, cynical designers like myself.

There is an honest purity with The Designers Oaths, which was beautiful to read, and try and I’ve tried to recalibrate my own somewhat battle weary outlook.

There are a few of these that resonate with me, and one in particular that screams out to me with regards to logo redesigns and brand updates in mind, is from the The Designer’s Oath below:

1. If you can’t make it better; don’t make it worse.

Shervin Nakhjavani, Maxime Stinnett, Blake Terry and Junxian Yao.

It’s so clear and brief, yet often neglected in practice by those that really should know better.

A Designers Hippocratic Oath aka Design Manifesto, Design Code of Ethics

A Designers Hippocratic Oath 3
By Shalvi Sharma and Ashley Bernerd
A Designers Hippocratic Oath Design Manifesto, Design Code of Ethics
By Blake Terry
A Designers Hippocratic Oath Design Manifesto, Design Code of Ethics
By Sanuree, Jinal, Isla and Deban Jana

Other Design Oaths, Design Manifestos, and Design Codes of Ethics

There are numerous other variations of these Design Oaths, Design Manifesto’s, Design Codes of Ethics, Standards of Professional Practice, etc, created by various individuals and organisations over the years:


AIGA Standards of Professional Practice

AIGA: “AIA members are dedicated to the highest standards of professionalism, integrity and competence. The AIA Code of Ethics guides members’ conduct in fulfilling those obligations. The Code applies to the professional activities of all AIA members, regardless of their membership category.

The Code is arranged in three tiers: Canons (broad principles of conduct); Ethical standards (more specific goals toward which each should aspire); Rules of conduct (mandatory requirements).AIGA Standards of Professional Practice


AIA Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct

AIA: “A professional designer adheres to principles of integrity that demonstrate respect for the profession, for colleagues, for clients, for audiences or consumers, and for society as a whole.

These standards define the expectations of a professional designer and represent the distinction of an AIGA member in the practice of design. AIGA members at the Supporter level and above who have agreed to adhere to these standards are denoted in the Designer Directory by an AIGA logo.AIA Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct


1000 Words: A Manifesto for Sustainability in Design

1000 Words: “I don’t like the word manifesto. It reeks of dogma and rules—two things I instinctually reject. I do love the way it puts things on the line, but I don’t like lines, or groups. So a manifesto probably isn’t for me. The other thing about manifestos is that they appear (or are written so as to appear) self-evident. This kind of a priori writing is easy, since you simply lay out what seems obviously—even tautologically—true. Of course, this is the danger of manifestos, but also what makes them fun to read. And fun to write. So I’ll write this manifesto. I just might not sign it. 1000 Words: A Manifesto for Sustainability in Design


IDSA Code of Ethics

IDSA: “Recognizing that industrial designers affect the quality of life in our increasingly independent and complex society, and that responsible, ethical decision-making often requires conviction, courage, and ingenuity in today’s competitive business context: We, the members of the Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA), will endeavor to meet the standards set forth in this code, and strive to support and defend one another in doing so. IDSA Code of Ethics


RGD Code of Ethics

RGD: Registered Graphic Designers (RGDs) are committed to the highest professional and ethical standards when working for clients, as employees and in service to the general public. RGD has collaborated with the Society of Graphic Designers of Canada (GDC) and Société des designers graphiques du Québec (SDGQ) to create a unified Code of Ethics. RGD, GDC and SDGQ Members are required to abide by the Rules set out here.” RGD Code of Ethics


If you know of any other variations of these available to view, then please do leave a link to them in the Twitter thread:

The post A Designers Hippocratic Oath x4 facilitated by Minni Bredou @mbredouw and devised by her Students appeared first on The Logo Smith - The Logo Smith - Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio | The The Logo Smith is a Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio with over 28 Years Experience: Logo & Brand Identity; Website Design, Graphic Design, & Typography & Advertising | All Content © 2020 TheLogoSmith.co :)

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Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols Designed by Les Mason 1970 https://imjustcreative.com/man-and-his-mark-trademarks-and-company-symbols/2020/09/08 Tue, 08 Sep 2020 10:38:49 +0000 https://imjustcreative.com/?p=34328 The post Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols Designed by Les Mason 1970 appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols, designed by Les Mason, was part of the Impressions series; a range of paper promotions produced for Associated Pulp and…

The post Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols Designed by Les Mason 1970 appeared first on The Logo Smith - The Logo Smith - Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio | The The Logo Smith is a Freelance Logo Designer & Brand Identity Design Studio with over 28 Years Experience: Logo & Brand Identity; Website Design, Graphic Design, & Typography & Advertising | All Content © 2020 TheLogoSmith.co :)

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The post Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols Designed by Les Mason 1970 appeared first on The Logo Smith All Content © 2020 The Logo Smith.™ |

Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols, designed by Les Mason, was part of the Impressions series; a range of paper promotions produced for Associated Pulp and Paper Mills (APPM).

Each issue of Impressions was given a specific theme, and some of Australia’s most revered designers were commissioned for the project. 

Impressions Number Three explored trademarks and company symbols, designed by Les Mason.

Not sure you’d get away with titling a publication Man and His Mark today, but that just shows how things have changed.

Man and His Mark - Trademarks and Company Symbols Designed by Les Mason
Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols

There’s some interesting reading on these pages, if you are able to zoom in and read the text. It’s actually a good educational read about trademarks and symbols, and it is summed up by this text:

“It is hoped that as well as being entertaining and generally informative, Impressions number three will act as a practical guide to those people responsible for the projection of their company’s personality.”

I love the bit “…those people responsible for the projection of their company’s personality.”, that would include the likes of you and me.

For all those responsible for the creation and projection of their client’s company’s personality, we salute you.


→ Incidentally, this is from a fabulous website called Re:collection which is well worthy of your time exploring.

Re:collection was established in 2009 by Dominic Hofstede as an online archive of Australian graphic design, with a focus on work created between the years 1960–1990. 

https://recollection.com.au/about

Man and His Mark Credits

Art Direction: Geoff Digby
Design: Les Mason
Studio: Les Mason Graphic Design
Date: 1970

“Points to guide you on the creation and application of a trademark.”

Designed by Les Mason
Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols
Man and His Mark - Trademarks and Company Symbols Designed by Les Mason
Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols
Man and His Mark - Trademarks and Company Symbols Designed by Les Mason
Man and His Mark - Trademarks and Company Symbols Designed by Les Mason
Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols
Man and His Mark - Trademarks and Company Symbols Designed by Les Mason
Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols
Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols
Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols
Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols
Man and His Mark - Trademarks and Company Symbols Designed by Les Mason
Man and His Mark – Trademarks and Company Symbols

About Associated Pulp And Paper Mills Limited (APPM)

Associated Pulp And Paper Mills Limited (APPM) formed in 1936 under the auspices of the Collins House group with the amalgamation of Paper Makers Limited and Tasmanian Paper Company, becoming a large scale paper manufacturing operation at Burnie, Tasmania. A series of takeovers together with the commencement of manufacturing in Victoria and New South Wales made APPM a prominent force within the Australian paper and timber industry. The major shareholders included North Broken Hill Ltd, Broken Hill South Ltd, Australian Glass Manufacturers, Amalgamated Zinc and WH Smith and Company. Later becoming a subsidiary of North Broken Hill, the company was sold to AMCOR in 1993.

https://researchdata.edu.au/records-associated-pulp-mills-limited/186497

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