Blog Archives

All Archived Posts in x height



Original Article on Opentype

I have a particular fondness for fonts that have larger x-heights than those that do not, which is such a sweeping generalization to make, that I couldn't tell you specifically why other than in my head I know exactly why.

Ultimately for what I do, mostly creating logo designs, font selection is frighteningly crucial as you only have a few letters and these take the stage and spot-light.

If you make the wrong font choice for the logo, then you'll find it's really wrong.

Making a choice of large or small X-height to create the right message for a logo design involves understanding of: technical specifications, subjective aesthetics, overall context and finishing up with that well trusted gut-feeling.

Does a large x-height make fonts more legible? is a great read by Ralf Herrmann and will certainly gives you some things to dwell over when you come to choosing your next font




Download 4 Page Logo Guidelines Template

Logo identity guideline template

As promised, here is the basic template for the A4 single page set of identity guidelines for a general logo design. You can download below.

It covers the basic essentials that a client needs to keep the identity looking consistent and to avoid abusing the use of it such as distorting the image, changing colours, changing fonts etc.

3 Logo Template Styles

Since first posting this, I have now updated the download to include 3 styles of identity guide. Styles 1 and 2 are the same as previous, used for my Wavepulse Acoustics logo.

Style 2 contains a small colour section. So in one version I have removed one of the minimum size modules, and replaced it with a colour chart. Here you can specify the Pantone colour, the CMYK and HEX breakdown.

Style 3 is based on a new layout, and it's based on my revised layout which you can see for the Keyboard Kahuna logo. I will say that Style 3 uses slightly different font styles and the layout is quite different from Styles 1 and 2. A few wording changes have been made as well. For the main logo breakdown, I have substituted the 'X-height' reference found in Styles 1 and 2 to 'Cap-Height' due to the fact this logo uses all capitals. Thus made sense to use the 'Xap Height' reference instead of 'X-height', make sure you use the right one for your own logo.

You will find that you will need to chop and change each layout for your own use.

As this is the template I use myself, please consider making style changes to inject your own brand into the mix. Font styles, colours etc could all be changed.

Spacing between sections

I have not paid too much attention to spacing on this template. This will all change once you have your own stuff in there. Just pay attention to vertical spacing of each section when you are done, leave enough vertical space between 'primary logo', 'alternative logo versions', 'fonts used in logotype' and 'don't abuse logotype.

Remember, it's all about presentation. Don't cram too much in.

InDesign Template

The original design I used for Wavepulse Acoustics guideline design was created in Illustrator, but felt InDesign would be easier to maintain. I have re-created it using layers and font styles, to make it super easy for you to customise. I have inserted tinted screen shots of the Wavepulse logos which are locked to a layer. So you need to drop your own artwork over the top. As well as InDesign CS4, there is a InDesign CS3.inx file included as well.

The guides are not ‘pixel perfect’, they really don’t need to be. So don’t bust a gut here. It’s only a visual guide, it’s not being mass printed.

Illustrator logo

The actual main logo, seen above in top photo has been created in Illustrator as a separate file. As with the InDesign file, I have used layers to separate each element, the grey striped background, the blue area, the magenta lines, the logo and type are all layered. It is available as InDesign CS4, Indesign INX and a PDF version.

Use these elements to form the logo breakdown, the guides, the boundaries and size details. It should all make sense when you open the Illustrator .ai files. Have provided CS1 CS2, and CS4 versions in the ZIP file.

Download

I have left text remarks on the InDesign file as reminders as to what needs to be done. I am sure much chopping and changing will be required for your own personal requirements, rather than using as is.

Download 4 Page Logo Guidelines Template

I hope this proves somewhat useful and maybe will encourage more logo designers to start providing these styles of identity guidelines with your completed logo projects.