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Whilst getting over Christmas, I was preparing a quick post about Fonts In Use (found on Coudal) but then they featured an article about The Egotist Network which I also wanted to post about. So now I can blog about both in one post. Convenient.

That pretty much sums up what Fonts in Use is about. The website is a lovely catalogue of typography in use in the real world, from branding, advertising, signage, packaging, publications, in print and online — all with an emphasis on the typefaces used.

Read more about their Mission.

I would say it's a daunting task, how on earth do you choose what to feature when you have so much choice, but this is clearly just the start for the project. Certainly no shortage of subject matter.

I imagine it's not a quick process to knock up a case study, a certain amount of research is needed just to get the basic information.

The image above gives you an idea of the content so far, as as well as the particular discipline you get a list of typefaces used and written about.

An example study - The Egotist Network

For example, picking the Graphic Design format, I can choose the case study about The Egotist Network. I would say it's pretty obvious why I chose this as an example. The following image shows a portion of the case studies with a quick list of typefaces used on the right

They breakdown the particular typographic elements used, in this case the nameplates used by each network. Personal views are offered by the author as well as the names of fonts used.

This is a fantastic idea they have going here and I look forward to new studies as well as any future plans for Fonts in Use. Once they have been around for a while, it will be pretty interesting to be able to click on a certain typeface in the main navigation and see where and how it has been used. At the moment there is one case study per typeface listed,

If you like to dig and poke around, then this ought to be a site that you bookmark and subscribe to.








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This free font: Apple-Sans-Adjectives is certainly quite fun, and intriguing, but not so sure on the practical side of things

Apple-Sans-Adjectives was designed [email protected] & @Rich_Cahill, and they have kindly made this font available as a freed